Week 24 – June 11 – 17, 2012

Week 24 – June 11 – 17, 2012

Monday, June 11th: Today we started doing push-ups.  A long time ago I started the 100 push-ups challenge (http://hundredpushups.com/).  I blogged about the benefits of push-ups in March 2011, click here to read that post.  For some reason I stopped, if I am remembering correctly I had to repeat a certain week three times and was a little frustrated.  Now I am determined to try again.  Our total of push-ups for the three days we did them was 112.

Tuesday, June 12th:  Charlie wanted to carry Nola Mae.  He didn’t last long with her on his back because it took me a while to wrap them together.


Wednesday, June 13th:  Today one of our chickens laid this tiny egg. 

I am finally getting back to using my clothes line.  I had a few items that needed bleaching in the sun.  Most importantly, the reason why I took this picture is because girls’ clothes are so cute on Nola Mae and even on the clothes line!

Thursday, June 14th:  After the morning of summer school we went to the park for a picnic lunch and then to our favorite library.  Henry and I made egg salad for us.

After the library I made these chocolate chip cookies that everyone loved!  Secret ingredient…garbanzo beans!  This recipe came from the Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids Eating Good Food  cookbook.  They were much better than the brownies that we made for Charlie to take to school.

Friday, June 15th:  This morning we went to Waupaca to run errands and met with my lactation consultant.  We have concerns that Nola Mae hasn’t been gaining weight at the normal rate a baby should.  I wasn’t too worried about this because I have been feeling like she is breastfeeding enough, even though I think she sleeps a lot, and was probably gaining weight.  I was wrong!  She hasn’t even gained the bare minimum in the last week and a half.  I left there with different things to try and plans to get another weight done in a week and a heavy weight of stress on my shoulders.

By the afternoon Nola Mae was crying, screaming, gassy, pooping and making whimpering/little moaning sounds during her sleepy times.  Henry seemed very concerned and was trying to make her happy here after a diaper change.

I nursed her often and wrapped her up and carried her around and this seemed to keep her happy.  During the night she had a fever.

Saturday, June 16th:  The only thing I accomplished today was finishing this Mei Tai that I made for my friend Sarah.

Sunday, June 17th:  What do Vater Boys do for Father’s Day?  Jack took the boys to the woods to make firewood.  His brother called to wish him a “Happy Father’s Day” and told me that he was building a wood shed with his kids.  I wasn’t surprised Eddie had news of a project to work on.  There is no sitting around in this family!

After Henry’s nap time we went to Little Falls.

Sometime I wish this cage was in our yard.

While I cooked Jack’s favorite dinner, Jack downloaded photos from the day and the boys surprised Jack by unloading the firewood from this morning.

Happy Father’s Day to the best Papa!

Week 16 – April 16 – 22, 2012

Week 16 – April 16 – 22, 2012

Monday, April 16th:  I have wanted to take a photo of my children in this basket around Easter time every year.  I thought it was perfect timing to do it this year with our Easter baby.

Nola Mae had her one week visit from our midwife, Christie.  Here she is getting weighed.

Checkers after school.

Tuesday, April 17th:  I put these orange peels in vinegar the day we came down with the flu.  We ate a lot of oranges that day (and I haven’t eaten any oranges since getting sick) this is a half gallon jar.  Once the peels have soaked for a couple of weeks I will save the liquid in a spray bottle for a cleaning solution.  Click here for the directions I followed. 

Henry “making somefin” for me.  Just a mess for me and a little fun for him.

Wednesday, April 18th:  I was feeling anxious to get out of the house (actually off our property) so we loaded up in the car and went to my friend’s house for a playdate.  It was wonderful for me to hang out with a few wonderful moms and wonderful for Henry to play with other kids.

 

Thursday, April 19th:  I have been taking these supplements for over a week.  They have been helping me.

We tried out my pouch sling today because I needed her to breastfeed secretly.  Henry has been wanting to “nuk” every time Nola Mae “nuks”.

Friday, April 20th:  It snowed over night.  I wished I had the energy to get out our skis to ski around the yard!  The latest we have ever skied was the 27th of April (2008).

I made this pillowcase for Charlie’s friend.

Saturday, April 21st:  I had Jack take this pose of me with the intentions of a second photo with the baby on the outside.  Two weeks later we got the shot of the baby on the outside.  I am disappointed that I didn’t have my long sleeves on for the second photo so it would look similar to the first photo.

   

Sunday, April 22nd:  My Step-Mom, Lynn, came for the weekend.  I had a wonderful visit with her.   She spent quality time with each boy and did many jobs for me around the house.   On her last day we took her to my favorite spot, the Big Falls Hydro Dam.

Our first week with Nola Mae Margaret

Our first week with Nola Mae Margaret

Nola Mae Margaret

The birth announcement for the newspaper was written by Grandma Helen (A.K.A. Hanna) the family genealogist:

A daughter, Nola Mae Margaret Vater, was born at home on Easter morning, April 8, 2012, to Jack and Jenny Vater of rural Iola, Wisconsin.  The birth was attended by In the Beginning Midwives – Jane Peterson, Christie Woodliff, and Korina Pubanz.

 She weighed 9 pounds and 3 ounces and was 21 1/2 inches long.

 Nola Mae has brothers Robert (age 8), Charles (age 6), and Henry (age 3). 

Grandparents are Jerry and Alice Hamm, Owen, Robert Schroeder and Lynn Hunsicker, Milwaukee, Rob and Helen Blaha, Loyal, and Neil P. Vater, deceased.

Great-grandparents are Neil and Eileen Vater, Owen, Ed and Elma Eloranta, Owen, Richard Fabian, Sussex and Barb Hunsicker, Port Washington.

Here is the birth announcement that was made on Facebook by our midwives:

The joy and celebration of welcoming a daughter on Easter morning moved us all.  Her 3 brothers will have so much to teach her, like the biology lesson her brother Henry who watched her coming shared moments later with the vivid details only an amazed 3-year-old boy could tell with such excitement!! And her beautiful name is Nola Mae.

My favorite photos from Nola Mae’s first week…

Saturday, April 7th:  Jack woke me up early to take the last belly shot that I wanted because the lighting was perfect.  We didn’t know this was going to be my last morning with my baby belly.

Sunday, April 8th:  Nola Mae made sure she had her own birthday, one day after Henry’s.  I wasn’t too surprised that Henry woke up early enough to witness the birth.

Monday, April 9th:  Today was the last day for Robbie and Charlie’s spring break.  My Mom and Helen were here on this day working so hard keeping the boys busy, cleaning, doing laundry and cooking many meals.

Tuesday, April 10th:  Our boys learned how to Eskimo kiss from Jack.

Wednesday, April 11th:  Our first day out in the sunshine.

Thursday, April 12th:  Henry making sure Nola Mae’s clothes are okay for her to wear.

Friday, April 13th:  Henry reading books to Nola Mae.

 

Saturday, April 14th:  My Dad and Step-Mom, Lynn came to visit for the day.  They brought us lunch, played with the boys and we all went for a hike in the woods.

Sunday, April 15th:  Our first time “do two of them” in Henry’s words.

World Breastfeeding Week – 2011

World Breastfeeding Week – 2011

World Breastfeeding Week is August 1 – 7. This week many people all over the world are celebrating.  I am celebrating this week by continuing to breastfeed my son, sharing this information to reach others and later in the week I will be attending the photo exhibit at the Waupaca Public Library.

Some of you may already know this:  I am a Lactivist! (and always will be)

Wikipedia defines “lactivist” as someone who seeks to promote the health benefits of breastfeeding over formula-feeding and to ensure that nursing mothers are not discriminated against.

In my 70 months of cumulative breastfeeding my three sons I was asked to leave the location I was breastfeeding my baby once.   I recently realized that I am very fortunate to have experienced this only once.  The situation ended very positively because I was confident in myself and my mothering, and later a little education was done and I received a lot of support from the head person at that facility, thank you Molly!

I feel very strongly about mothers giving breastfeeding a chance, mothers continuing to breastfeed their babies for as long as possible and feeling free and comfortable to breastfeed whenever and where ever their baby is hungry.

If you see a mother breastfeeding her baby in public, PLEASE give her a big smile, or a “thumbs-up” or maybe tell her that it is good to see her feeding her baby.  Please don’t give dirty looks or shoo your curious child away!

FACT SHEET

The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding outlines steps that can be taken to remove some of the obstacles faced by women who want to breastfeed their babies.

How many American women breastfeed their babies?

  • Three out of four mothers (75%) in the U.S. start out breastfeeding, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2010 Breastfeeding Report Card.
  • At the end of six months, breastfeeding rates fall to 43%, and only 13% of babies are exclusively breastfed.
  • Among African-American babies, the rates are significantly lower, 58% start out breastfeeding, and 28% breastfeed at six months, with 8% exclusively breastfed at six months.
  • The Healthy People 2020 objectives for breastfeeding are: 82% ever breastfed, 61% at 6 months, and 34% at 1 year.

What are the health benefits of breastfeeding?

  • Breastfeeding protects babies from infections and illnesses that include diarrhea, ear infections and pneumonia.
  • Breastfed babies are less likely to develop asthma.
  • Children who are breastfed for six months are less likely to become obese.
  • Breastfeeding also reduces the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Mothers who breastfeed have a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancers.

What are the economic benefits of breastfeeding?

  • Families who follow optimal breastfeeding practices can save between $1,200–$1,500 in expenditures on infant formula in the first year alone.
  • A study published last year in the journal Pediatrics estimated that if 90% of U.S. families followed guidelines to breastfeed exclusively for six months, the U.S. would annually save $13 billion from reduced medical and other costs.
  • For both employers and employees, better infant health means fewer health insurance claims, less employee time off to care for sick children, and higher productivity.
  • Mutual of Omaha found that health care costs for newborns are three times lower for babies whose mothers participate in the company’s employee maternity and lactation program.

What obstacles do mothers encounter when they attempt to breastfeed?

  • Lack of experience or understanding among family members of how best to support mothers and babies.
  • Not enough opportunities to communicate with other breastfeeding mothers.
  • Lack of up-to-date instruction and information from health care professionals.
  • Hospital practices that make it hard to get started with successful breastfeeding.
  • Lack of accommodation to breastfeed or express milk at the workplace.

What can the health care community do?

  • More hospitals can incorporate the recommendations of UNICEF/WHO’s Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.
  • Provide breastfeeding education for health clinicians who care for women and children.
  • Ensure access to International Board Certified Lactation Consultants.

What can employers do?

  • Start and maintain high-quality lactation support programs for employees.
  • Provide clean places for mothers to breastfeed.
  • Work toward establishing paid maternity leave for employed mothers.

What can community leaders do?

  • Strengthen programs that provide mother-to-mother support and peer counseling.
  • Use community organizations to promote and support breastfeeding.

What can families and friends of mothers do?

  • Give mothers the support and encouragement they need to breastfeed.
  • Take advantage of programs to educate fathers and grandmothers about breastfeeding.

What can policymakers do?

  • Support small nonprofit organizations that promote breastfeeding in African-American communities.
  • Support compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes.
  • Increase funding of high-quality research on breastfeeding.
  • Support better tracking of breastfeeding rates as well as factors that affect breastfeeding.

This info was found at: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/breastfeeding/factsheet.html

Related Article:

Breastfeeding Courtesyhttp://networkedblogs.com/qjTC7

I am interested in knowing:

How have you supported a breastfeeding mother?

How many cumulative months have you breastfed?

I’m not normal (& neither are my friends)

Recently I was told that the way I parent doesn’t fit in the norms of this society.  Our parenting  isn’t normal in our society; it’s better!

Our boys are being raised in a farm environment, we do many activities with our boys (camping, snowshoeing, x-c skiing, making firewood, sewing and woodworking – just to name a few).  We take time to teach them skills and expose them to different experiences.   Show me a  5 and 7-year-old that can cut veggies for soup, or split a piece of wood with a splitting mall, sew on a sewing machine or make something on the lathe.

      

I have learned many things from the parenting books I have read,  from my mother, my mother-in-law, my sister and many other mothers in my life who I admire.

Below are some statistics that my Mom found on just a few topics relating to my parenting.  I was curious to see how my friends and I (22 of us) matched up to the “Norms”.  I have included our statistics.  If I went deeper it would only show more areas where I am not normal.  

Births:

99.38% of births are in Hospitals or are unplanned out of hospital
.62% are planned home births  (www.uptodate.com/contents/planned-home-birth)

 My friends and I:  Planned Home Births – 36%  &  Hospital Births – 64%

Breastfeeding:

64% of mothers initiated Breastfeeding
29% at still breastfeeding at 6 mos
6% were still breastfeeding at 12 mos

 My friends and I: Were still breastfeeding at 12 months + – 100%

Work:

68% of mothers with college degrees and with children under 6 yrs are in the workforce.(smartmomma.com/work_career/can’t_we_get_along.htm)

 My friends and I: Stay-at-home Moms  – 73% & Working Moms – 27%

TV:

99% of households have TV and on average, children ages 2-5 spend 32 hours a week in front of a TV—watching television, DVDs, DVR and videos, and using a game console.
90% households have cable TV or the equivalent
1% don’t have a TV  (www.csun.edu/science/health/docs/tv&health.html)
 

 My friends and I:  0% of my friends’ kids spend anywhere close to 32 hours in front of the TV—watching television, DVDs, DVR and videos, and using a game console!

AND

My friends and I: No TV – 55% & Have TVs  – 45%

Spanking:

94% of parents spank their child by the time the child is 4 yrs (Psychology Today)
25% of those use an object to spank a child
6% never spank   (www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200210/spare-the-rod)

 My friends and I: Never Spank – 77% &  Spank – 23%.

I’m Not too NORMAL, are you?

Project 365 Week 5

Project 365:  Take a photo a day and see your life in a whole new way.

2/2/11 – (Wednesday) One of my weekly jobs is to throw hay down.   My supply of small square bales is low.  I am saving those for last, mainly because the small bales are stacked above my chicken coop and is great insulation.  I still have a good supply of the large round bales and so that is what I am feeding Vanilla (cow) and Mystique (horse).  This process is a lot more work, but a lot of fun for boys.

Once the hay is thrown down the hay shoot, the fun begins! 

 

2/3/11 – (Thursday) A necklace (made by my Aunt Anita) for me to wear while breastfeeding, it helps keep Henry’s busy hands occupied.

 

2/4/11 – (Friday) Tooth fairy pillows I made for my nephew

and for a friend.

 

2/5/11 – (Saturday) This is an unusal sight…Henry angry and crying! 

Henry rarely cries and never is angry.   His expression of anger or frustration is something I haven’t see before.   Today he was very hungry!  I often offer him food in hopes that he will eat something.  Apparently I didn’t offer him enough food today.  He climbed onto his chair and started crying and grunting and signing “eat”.

 

2/6/11 – (Sunday) Peace: a quiet house (and very clean), a cup of hot tea and good books to read.